Want to use less energy?

Let's start by looking at where and how you use it now.

This is how an average Australian household uses their energy1


So how can you use less?

You don't have to sweat through summer and shiver through winter. Small changes can make a big difference.

ac_unitUp to 40% of your energy bill could be your heating or cooling 2

Cool it on the heating

There are some simple things you can do to get your heating bill down:

  • Set your heat to 18-20°C – each degree over 20°C uses around 10% more energy.
  • When it's really cold, snuggle up under an electric throw, turn off your portable heater and save between $70 and $280 a year 3.

Ease up on the air con

Getting hot under the collar over your cooling bills? Try these tips to keep them down:

  • Set your air con to 24°C or higher – each degree under uses 5% more energy.
  • Use fans instead of air con – and save between $40 and $200 a year4.
  • Only use your air con when it gets over 30°C and save between $50 and $340 a year5.

invert_colorsYou could be using 20% of your household energy just to heat water 6

Shorter, cheaper showers

  • We know 4 minute showers save water, but did you know they could save you between $60 and $650 a year? 7
  • Change your showerhead to a 3-star rated one – and save between $190 and $700 a year 8

Pull the plug on your entertainment energy use

Simply switch off, when you’re not streaming and you could save between:

  • $25 and $45 a year 9 on your TV, sound bar and game console.
  • $30 and $55 a year 10 on your desktop computer, modem and printer.
  • Set your fridge to 4 or 5℃ and your freezer to -15℃. Each degree colder uses 5% more energy 11

Gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if you don’t have gas, there are other ways to save:

  • Your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove 12
  • If you are using the stove – keep a lid on your pots. You use up to 70% less energy this way 13
  • Turn the grill on and get our your toaster - it uses 33% less energy to make toast14.

 Clean up in the laundry

  • Wash your clothes in cold water, and save between $85 and $145 a year 15.
  • Hang your washing out once a week, instead of tumble drying, and save between $40 and 80 a year 16.

wb_incandescentYou could be using 6% of your energy spend just keeping the lights on 18

How to lighten the lighting load:

  • Switch on few lamps and turn off your down-lights and save between $50 and $140 a year. 17

Spend a bit more to save lots

If you spend a bit, you can really start to see some energy savings:

  • Insulate your house and you could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills 18
  • Switch to solar hot water - it could supply up to 90% of your hot water 19

See a year-on-year difference

We've done a state-by-state breakdown of the annual energy savings of our tips.

local_laundry_serviceHousehold appliances - their energy consumption

Our energy fact sheets show you estimated running costs for common appliances – in each state.


The technical stuff

For savings figures specific to your state, see the estimated yearly energy savings page.

We based our estimated savings on these resources and calculations:

The general domestic usage price per unit from the electricity distribution networks in your state (incl GST). Prices per unit are effective:

  • In Queensland as of 9 March 2018.
  • In New South Wales as of 9 March 2018.
  • In the ACT as of 9 March 2018.
  • In South Australia as of 9 March 2018.
  • In Victoria as of 9 March 2018.

1, 2 & 6. www.yourhome.gov.au/energy/appliances projected average home energy use 1986 to 2020.

3. Using a 150 watt heated throw rug at a maximum setting of 20℃ instead of a 1,000 watt portable heater for 5 hours a day on days with lows of 12℃ or lower.

4. A using a 65 watt ceiling fan for 10 hours a day, compared to a 7.5 kW capacity air conditioner (2.42 kW input) with the thermostat set at 24℃ for 5 hours a day on days with temperatures between 28℃ and 30℃. You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

5. A 7.7 kW capacity air conditioner (2.42 kW input) with the thermostat set at 24℃, used on days with highs of 30℃ or more.

7. Gas hot water, showering for 4 mins instead of 8 mins twice a day using an enegy efficient shower fitting (7 L/min flow) over 90-per day summer quarter (Nov-Jan). You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

8. Gas hot water with annual savings in a medium sized household (4 people using 90 MJ/day). You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

9. A plasma TV circa 2016 (using 2.5 watts on standby), soundbar (using 0.5 watts on standby) and game console (using 15.7 watts on standby) on standby for 21 hours a day. You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

10. A desktop computer (using 3.5 watts on standby) and ADSL wireless modem (using 8.3 watts on standby) on standby for 20 hours a day and a laser printer (using 8.8 watts on standby) on standby for 23 hours a day. You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

11. www.yourhome.gov.au/energy/appliances.

12, 13 & 14. The ACT Government's Energy Smart Booklet.

15. A 7kg capacity top load washer, once a day, on a normal program with cold water (20℃) compared to warm water (40℃). You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

16. A 5.5kg auto-sense type dryer, consuming 4.5kW per load, saving 1 load a week each year. You can find savings figures specific to your state, on our estimated yearly energy savings page.

17. Two 15 watt CFLs used instead of 5 x 50 watt halogen downlights for an average of 5 hours a day each year.

18. & 19. Your Home: Australia's guide to environmentally sustainable homes

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The Retailer Energy Efficiency Scheme (REES) in South Australia

In 2009, the South Australian Government introduced an energy efficiency scheme – offering services such as in-home energy audits, installation of energy efficient products and a range of advice.

The energy efficiency products available for homes under the Scheme include:

  • Energy Efficient Lighting*
  • Standby Power Controllers
  • Water Saving Showerheads
  • Chimney Balloons

Retailers offer free in-home energy audits for priority group households, as well as advice on other energy efficiency activities through their partners.

As Origin has met its Energy Efficiency Audit Target for 2017 with the Essential Services Commission of SA, we aren’t offering Home Energy Efficiency Audits under the REES this year.

If you need a new Home Energy Efficiency Audit, please contact the SA Government Energy Advisory Service.

*The existing lighting equipment must be in working order at the time of the upgrade. Some upgrades may be excluded based on specific scheme eligibility requirements.