ENERGY EFFICIENCY TIPS

where you use energy

To get ideas on how to save energy, it's a good idea to start by looking at how and where you use it.

A breakdown of how the average Australian household uses energy.15


where you can save energy

You don't have to give up comfort to keep your energy bills down.
Small changes to your energy use can make big differences to your energy bills.

 

heating and cooling


You might be using up to 40% of your energy bill to heat or cool your home.15
Small changes here could lead to big savings.


Handy heating hints

  • Only heat the rooms you're using.
  • Keep your windows and doors closed when the heater is on or when it's cold outside.
  • Use draft stoppers and seals to stop drafts coming in and hot air from going outside.

Use your heater efficiently

  • Use your heating system's zoning option to heat your living areas during the day and bedroom at night.
  • Always close the doors to rooms you're not using so the heat stays in. 
  • Keep your thermostat at 18-20℃ - each degree over 20 uses about 10% more energy.
  • Hot air rises - so turn your ceiling fan on a low speed to gently push the warm air back towards you.

Tips for keeping cool

  • After a hot day, open your windows or use ventilation fans to let the hot air out.
  • Shut the doors of unused rooms to keep the space you're coolling to a minimum.
  • On hot days, keep your air conditioner at 24℃ - each degree under this uses about 5% more energy.
  • Use external blinds or awnings to keep the heat out.

Cool it on the air conditioner

  • Unless the mercury goes over 30℃, use fans to cool your home instead of the air conditioner.
  • Use your air conditioner for an hour less on hot days and you could save around $31 a year.16
  • Only use your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 30℃ and you could save around $106 a year.17
  • Use your ceiling fans for twice as long as your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 28 and you could save around $85 a year.18

 

hot water


The average Australian home uses about 20% of its energy to heat water.15 
It's quite easy to find ways to save money.


Washing dishes

  • Rinse your dishes in cold water, not hot, before washing them or putting them in the dishwasher.
  • Make sure your dishwasher is full before you turn it on.
  • Switch your dishwasher off before the drying cycle and let your dishes air-dry.
  • Leave your mixer tap in the cold position, so hot water isn't wasted cooling in the pipe.

In the bathroom

  • Stick to short, four-minute showers. You could save up to $28 a year.19
  • Switch from a standard showerhead to a 3-star rated head. You could save around $233 a year.20

 

home appliances


Your appliances could be using up to 23% of your home's energy.15


Switch things off a the wall, instead of leaving them on stand-by, and you could save around:

  • $37 a year21 from your TV, set-top box and game console. 
  • $25 a year22 from your desktop computer, modem and printer. 
  • $8 a year23 by turning off your washing machine when you're not using it.

Cooking

As a rule, cooking with gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if that's not an option, try these simple ideas:

  • Set your over to fan-forced - it cooks quicker and more evenly than conventional settings.
  • Cook with a pressure cooker, electric fry pan or microwave - your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove.24
  • Keep a lid on simmering pots - this can reduce your energy use by up to 70%.24
  • Make sure the seals on your oven are in good condition to prevent heat escaping.


Your fridge and freezer

  • Check if your fridge door is sealed properly by placing a strip of paper betwee the door and the fridge. If you can pull the paper out easily, it might be time for  reseal.

 

in the laundry


From the washing machine to the iron, cleaning clothes uses a lot of energy and water. Here's how to cut back.


  • Dry your clothes on a line rather than using your dryer. Do this once a week and you could save up to $43 a year.25
  • Washing a full load of laundry uses the same amount of energy as a half load. Try to do all your washing at the same time and make all your loads full ones. 
  • When it's time to buy a new washing machine or dryer, look for one with:
    • A fast spin cycle - some of the best machines have spin speeds over 1600 rpm.
    • A dryer with an auto-sensing control that switches off when your clothes are dry.
    • At least a 4-star energy rating and 4-star water rating.
    • A front loading washing machine, you'll use even less water and energy.
  • Try to do your ironing in large batches - that way you won't waste energy heating and reheating your iron every time.

 

lighting


Did you know that about 6% of the average home's energy bill comes from lighting?15


Try these bright ideas

  • Get into the habit of turning off the lights when you leave a room.
  • If you don't need much light, use lamps or spotlights instead of lighting the whole room.
  • Install motion sensors or timers on your security lights - so you don't have to remember to turn them off at night. 
  • Use solar lights to light up your garden pathways - they store energy during the day and then light up automatically at night. 

 

big or small investment


Small investment

  • Keep heat in by sealing gaps and crackes in walls, doors and floors.
  • Use draft stoppers on windows and doors.
  • Use a shade cloth or external blinds to keep heat out.

Large investment

  • Insulate your house - it's a cost-effective investment and could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills.26
  • Try a pergola or other shade device to keep direct sunlight off your windows.
  • Install skylights in your darker rooms - they look great and you won't need to use your lights as much.
  • Install solar hot water - it could provide up to 90% of your hot water needs.27
  • Front loading washing machines use less energy than top loaders.
  • Always check the energy efficiency label when buying new appliances. The more stars it has, the move efficient it is.

 

heating and cooling


You might be using up to 40% of your energy bill to heat or cool your home.15
Small changes here could lead to big savings.


Handy heating hints

  • Only heat the rooms you're using.
  • Keep your windows and doors closed when the heater is on or when it's cold outside.
  • Use draft stoppers and seals to stop drafts coming in and hot air from going outside.

Use your heater efficiently

  • Use your heating system's zoning option to heat your living areas during the day and bedroom at night.
  • Always close the doors to rooms you're not using so the heat stays in. 
  • Keep your thermostat at 18-20℃ - each degree over 20 uses about 10% more energy.
  • Hot air rises - so turn your ceiling fan on a low speed to gently push the warm air back towards you.

Tips for keeping cool

  • After a hot day, open your windows or use ventilation fans to let the hot air out.
  • Shut the doors of unused rooms to keep the space you're coolling to a minimum.
  • On hot days, keep your air conditioner at 24℃ - each degree under this uses about 5% more energy.
  • Use external blinds or awnings to keep the heat out.

Cool it on the air conditioner

  • Unless the mercury goes over 30℃, use fans to cool your home instead of the air conditioner.
  • Use your air conditioner for an hour less on hot days and you could save arounnd $35 a year.16
  • Only use your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 30℃ and you could save around $204 a year.17
  • Use your ceiling fans for twice as long as your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 28℃ and you could save around $75 a year.18

 

hot water


The average Australian home uses about 20% of its energy to heat water.15 
It's quite easy to find ways to save money.


Washing dishes

  • Rinse your dishes in cold water, not hot, before washing them or putting them in the dishwasher.
  • Make sure your dishwasher is full before you turn it on.
  • Switch your dishwasher off before the drying cycle and let your dishes air-dry.
  • Leave your mixer tap in the cold position, so hot water isn't wasted cooling in the pipe.

In the bathroom

  • Stick to short, four-minute showers. You could save up to $28 a year.19
  • Switch from a standard showerhead to a 3-star rated head. You could save around $233 a year.20

 

home appliances


Your appliances could be using up to 23% of your home's energy.15


Switch things off a the wall, instead of leaving them on stand-by, and you could save around:

  • $54 a year21 from your TV, set-top box and game console. 
  • $36 a year22 from your desktop computer, modem and printer. 
  • $12 a year23 by turning off your washing machine when you're not using it.

Cooking

As a rule, cooking with gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if that's not an option, try these simple ideas:

  • Set your over to fan-forced - it cooks quicker and more evenly than conventional settings.
  • Cook with a pressure cooker, electric fry pan or microwave - your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove.24
  • Keep a lid on simmering pots - this can reduce your energy use by up to 70%.24
  • Make sure the seals on your oven are in good condition to prevent heat escaping.


Your fridge and freezer

  • Check if your fridge door is sealed properly by placing a strip of paper betwee the door and the fridge. If you can pull the paper out easily, it might be time for  reseal.

 

in the laundry


From the washing machine to the iron, cleaning clothes uses a lot of energy and water. Here's how to cut back.


  • Dry your clothes on a line rather than using your dryer. Do this once a week and you could save up to $62 a year.25
  • Washing a full load of laundry uses the same amount of energy as a half load. Try to do all your washing at the same time and make all your loads full ones.
  • When it's time to buy a new washing machine or dryer, look for one with:
    • A fast spin cycle - some of the best machines have spin speeds over 1600 rpm.
    • A dryer with an auto-sensing control that switches off when your clothes are dry.
    • At least a 4-star energy rating and 4-star water rating.
    • A front loading washing machine, you'll use even less water and energy.
  • Try to do your ironing in large batches - that way you won't waste energy heating and reheating your iron every time.

 

lighting


Did you know that about 6% of the average home's energy bill comes from lighting?15


Try these bright ideas

  • Get into the habit of turning off the lights when you leave a room.
  • If you don't need much light, use lamps or spotlights instead of lighting the whole room.
  • Install motion sensors or timers on your security lights - so you don't have to remember to turn them off at night. 
  • Use solar lights to light up your garden pathways - they store energy during the day and then light up automatically at night. 

 

Big or small investment


Small investment

  • Keep heat in by sealing gaps and crackes in walls, doors and floors.
  • Use draft stoppers on windows and doors.
  • Use a shade cloth or external blinds to keep heat out.

Large investment

  • Insulate your house - it's a cost-effective investment and could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills.26
  • Try a pergola or other shade device to keep direct sunlight off your windows.
  • Install skylights in your darker rooms - they look great and you won't need to use your lights as much.
  • Install solar hot water - it could provide up to 90% of your hot water needs.27
  • Front loading washing machines use less energy than top loaders.
  • Always check the energy efficiency label when buying new appliances. The more stars it has, the move efficient it is.

 

heating and cooling


You might be using up to 40% of your energy bill to heat or cool your home.15
Small changes here could lead to big savings.


Handy heating hints

  • Only heat the rooms you're using.
  • Keep your windows and doors closed when the heater is on or when it's cold outside.
  • Use draft stoppers and seals to stop drafts coming in and hot air from going outside.

Use your heater efficiently

  • Use your heating system's zoning option to heat your living areas during the day and bedroom at night.
  • Always close the doors to rooms you're not using so the heat stays in. 
  • Keep your thermostat at 18-20℃ - each degree over 20 uses about 10% more energy.
  • Hot air rises - so turn your ceiling fan on a low speed to gently push the warm air back towards you.

Tips for keeping cool

  • After a hot day, open your windows or use ventilation fans to let the hot air out.
  • Shut the doors of unused rooms to keep the space you're coolling to a minimum.
  • On hot days, keep your air conditioner at 24℃ - each degree under this uses about 5% more energy.
  • Use external blinds or awnings to keep the heat out.

Cool it on the air conditioner

  • Unless the mercury goes over 30℃, use fans to cool your home instead of the air conditioner.
  • Use your air conditioner for an hour less on hot days and you could save around $100 a year.16
  • Only use your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 30℃ and you could save around $483 a year.17
  • Use your ceiling fans for twice as long as your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 28℃ and you could save around $187 a year.18

 

hot water


The average Australian home uses about 20% of its energy to heat water.15 
It's quite easy to find ways to save money.


Washing dishes

  • Rinse your dishes in cold water, not hot, before washing them or putting them in the dishwasher.
  • Make sure your dishwasher is full before you turn it on.
  • Switch your dishwasher off before the drying cycle and let your dishes air-dry.
  • Leave your mixer tap in the cold position, so hot water isn't wasted cooling in the pipe.

In the bathroom

  • Stick to short, four-minute showers. You could save up to $39 a year.19
  • Switch from a standard showerhead to a 3-star rated head. You could save around $328 a year.20

 

home appliances


Your appliances could be using up to 23% of your home's energy.15


Switch things off a the wall, instead of leaving them on stand-by, and you could save around:

  • $52 a year21 from your TV, set-top box and game console. 
  • $35 a year22 from your desktop computer, modem and printer. 
  • $12 a year23 by turning off your washing machine when you're not using it.

Cooking

As a rule, cooking with gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if that's not an option, try these simple ideas:

  • Set your over to fan-forced - it cooks quicker and more evenly than conventional settings.
  • Cook with a pressure cooker, electric fry pan or microwave - your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove.24
  • Keep a lid on simmering pots - this can reduce your energy use by up to 70%.24
  • Make sure the seals on your oven are in good condition to prevent heat escaping.


Your fridge and freezer

  • Check if your fridge door is sealed properly by placing a strip of paper betwee the door and the fridge. If you can pull the paper out easily, it might be time for  reseal.

 

in the laundry


From the washing machine to the iron, cleaning clothes uses a lot of energy and water. Here's how to cut back.


  • Dry your clothes on a line rather than using your dryer. Do this once a week and you could save up to $60 a year.25
  • Washing a full load of laundry uses the same amount of energy as a half load. Try to do all your washing at the same time and make all your loads full ones. 
  • When it's time to buy a new washing machine or dryer, look for one with:
    • A fast spin cycle - some of the best machines have spin speeds over 1600 rpm.
    • A dryer with an auto-sensing control that switches off when your clothes are dry.
    • At least a 4-star energy rating and 4-star water rating.
    • A front loading washing machine, you'll use even less water and energy.
  • Try to do your ironing in large batches - that way you won't waste energy heating and reheating your iron every time.

 

lighting


Did you know that about 6% of the average home's energy bill comes from lighting?15


Try these bright ideas

  • Get into the habit of turning off the lights when you leave a room.
  • If you don't need much light, use lamps or spotlights instead of lighting the whole room.
  • Install motion sensors or timers on your security lights - so you don't have to remember to turn them off at night. 
  • Use solar lights to light up your garden pathways - they store energy during the day and then light up automatically at night. 

 

big or small investment


Small investment

  • Keep heat in by sealing gaps and crackes in walls, doors and floors.
  • Use draft stoppers on windows and doors.
  • Use a shade cloth or external blinds to keep heat out.

Large investment

  • Insulate your house - it's a cost-effective investment and could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills.26
  • Try a pergola or other shade device to keep direct sunlight off your windows.
  • Install skylights in your darker rooms - they look great and you won't need to use your lights as much.
  • Install solar hot water - it could provide up to 90% of your hot water needs.27
  • Front loading washing machines use less energy than top loaders.
  • Always check the energy efficiency label when buying new appliances. The more stars it has, the move efficient it is.

 

heating and cooling


You might be using up to 40% of your energy bill to heat or cool your home.15
Small changes here could lead to big savings.


Handy heating hints

  • Only heat the rooms you're using.
  • Keep your windows and doors closed when the heater is on or when it's cold outside.
  • Use draft stoppers and seals to stop drafts coming in and hot air from going outside.

Use your heater efficiently

  • Use your heating system's zoning option to heat your living areas during the day and bedroom at night.
  • Always close the doors to rooms you're not using so the heat stays in. 
  • Keep your thermostat at 18-20℃ - each degree over 20 uses about 10% more energy.
  • Hot air rises - so turn your ceiling fan on a low speed to gently push the warm air back towards you.

Tips for keeping cool

  • After a hot day, open your windows or use ventilation fans to let the hot air out.
  • Shut the doors of unused rooms to keep the space you're coolling to a minimum.
  • On hot days, keep your air conditioner at 24℃ - each degree under this uses about 5% more energy.
  • Use external blinds or awnings to keep the heat out.

Cool it on the air conditioner

  • Unless the mercury goes over 30℃, use fans to cool your home instead of the air conditioner.
  • Use your air conditioner for an hour less on hot days and you could save around $82 a year.16
  • Only use your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 30℃ and you could save around $180 a year.17
  • Use your ceiling fans for twice as long as your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 28℃ and you could save around $178 a year.18

 

hot water


The average Australian home uses about 20% of its energy to heat water.15 
It's quite easy to find ways to save money.


Washing dishes

  • Rinse your dishes in cold water, not hot, before washing them or putting them in the dishwasher.
  • Make sure your dishwasher is full before you turn it on.
  • Switch your dishwasher off before the drying cycle and let your dishes air-dry.
  • Leave your mixer tap in the cold position, so hot water isn't wasted cooling in the pipe.

In the bathroom

  • Stick to short, four-minute showers. You could save up to $9 a year.19
  • Switch from a standard showerhead to a 3-star rated head. You could save around $283 a year.20

 

home appliances


Your appliances could be using up to 23% of your home's energy.15


Switch things off a the wall, instead of leaving them on stand-by, and you could save around:

  • $72 a year21 from your TV, set-top box and game console. 
  • $49 a year22 from your desktop computer, modem and printer. 
  • $16 a year23 by turning off your washing machine when you're not using it.

Cooking

As a rule, cooking with gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if that's not an option, try these simple ideas:

  • Set your over to fan-forced - it cooks quicker and more evenly than conventional settings.
  • Cook with a pressure cooker, electric fry pan or microwave - your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove.24
  • Keep a lid on simmering pots - this can reduce your energy use by up to 70%.24
  • Make sure the seals on your oven are in good condition to prevent heat escaping.


Your fridge and freezer

  • Check if your fridge door is sealed properly by placing a strip of paper betwee the door and the fridge. If you can pull the paper out easily, it might be time for  reseal.

 

in the laundry


From the washing machine to the iron, cleaning clothes uses a lot of energy and water. Here's how to cut back.


  • Dry your clothes on a line rather than using your dryer. Do this once a week and you could save up to $83 a year.25
  • Washing a full load of laundry uses the same amount of energy as a half load. Try to do all your washing at the same time and make all your loads full ones. 
  • When it's time to buy a new washing machine or dryer, look for one with:
    • A fast spin cycle - some of the best machines have spin speeds over 1600 rpm.
    • A dryer with an auto-sensing control that switches off when your clothes are dry.
    • At least a 4-star energy rating and 4-star water rating.
    • A front loading washing machine, you'll use even less water and energy.
  • Try to do your ironing in large batches - that way you won't waste energy heating and reheating your iron every time.

 

lighting


Did you know that about 6% of the average home's energy bill comes from lighting?15


Try these bright ideas

  • Get into the habit of turning off the lights when you leave a room.
  • If you don't need much light, use lamps or spotlights instead of lighting the whole room.
  • Install motion sensors or timers on your security lights - so you don't have to remember to turn them off at night. 
  • Use solar lights to light up your garden pathways - they store energy during the day and then light up automatically at night. 

 

big or small investment


Small investment

  • Keep heat in by sealing gaps and crackes in walls, doors and floors.
  • Use draft stoppers on windows and doors.
  • Use a shade cloth or external blinds to keep heat out.

Large investment

  • Insulate your house - it's a cost-effective investment and could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills.26
  • Try a pergola or other shade device to keep direct sunlight off your windows.
  • Install skylights in your darker rooms - they look great and you won't need to use your lights as much.
  • Install solar hot water - it could provide up to 90% of your hot water needs.27
  • Front loading washing machines use less energy than top loaders.
  • Always check the energy efficiency label when buying new appliances. The more stars it has, the move efficient it is.

 

heating and cooling


You might be using up to 40% of your energy bill to heat or cool your home.15
Small changes here could lead to big savings.


Handy heating hints

  • Only heat the rooms you're using.
  • Keep your windows and doors closed when the heater is on or when it's cold outside.
  • Use draft stoppers and seals to stop drafts coming in and hot air from going outside.

Use your heater efficiently

  • Use your heating system's zoning option to heat your living areas during the day and bedroom at night.
  • Always close the doors to rooms you're not using so the heat stays in. 
  • Keep your thermostat at 18-20℃ - each degree over 20 uses about 10% more energy.
  • Hot air rises - so turn your ceiling fan on a low speed to gently push the warm air back towards you.

Tips for keeping cool

  • After a hot day, open your windows or use ventilation fans to let the hot air out.
  • Shut the doors of unused rooms to keep the space you're coolling to a minimum.
  • On hot days, keep your air conditioner at 24℃ - each degree under this uses about 5% more energy.
  • Use external blinds or awnings to keep the heat out.

Cool it on the air conditioner

  • Unless the mercury goes over 30℃, use fans to cool your home instead of the air conditioner.
  • Use your air conditioner for an hour less on hot days and you could save around $41 a year.16
  • Only use your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 30℃ and you could save around $127 a year.17
  • Use your ceiling fans for twice as long as your air conditioner when the temperature goes over 28℃ and you could save around $100 a year.18

 

hot water


The average Australian home uses about 20% of its energy to heat water.15 
It's quite easy to find ways to save money.


Washing dishes

  • Rinse your dishes in cold water, not hot, before washing them or putting them in the dishwasher.
  • Make sure your dishwasher is full before you turn it on.
  • Switch your dishwasher off before the drying cycle and let your dishes air-dry.
  • Leave your mixer tap in the cold position, so hot water isn't wasted cooling in the pipe.

In the bathroom

  • Stick to short, four-minute showers. You could save up to $22 a year.19
  • Switch from a standard showerhead to a 3-star rated head. You could save around $186 a year.20

 

home appliances


Your appliances could be using up to 23% of your home's energy.15


Switch things off a the wall, instead of leaving them on stand-by, and you could save around:

  • $55 a year21 from your TV, set-top box and game console. 
  • $37 a year22 from your desktop computer, modem and printer. 
  • $13 a year23 by turning off your washing machine when you're not using it.

Cooking

As a rule, cooking with gas is the most efficient way to cook. But if that's not an option, try these simple ideas:

  • Set your over to fan-forced - it cooks quicker and more evenly than conventional settings.
  • Cook with a pressure cooker, electric fry pan or microwave - your microwave uses up to 80% less energy than your electric stove.24
  • Keep a lid on simmering pots - this can reduce your energy use by up to 70%.24
  • Make sure the seals on your oven are in good condition to prevent heat escaping.


Your fridge and freezer

  • Check if your fridge door is sealed properly by placing a strip of paper betwee the door and the fridge. If you can pull the paper out easily, it might be time for  reseal.

 

in the laundry


From the washing machine to the iron, cleaning clothes uses a lot of energy and water. Here's how to cut back.


  • Dry your clothes on a line rather than using your dryer. Do this once a week and you could save up to $68 a year.25
  • Washing a full load of laundry uses the same amount of energy as a half load. Try to do all your washing at the same time and make all your loads full ones. 
  • When it's time to buy a new washing machine or dryer, look for one with:
    • A fast spin cycle - some of the best machines have spin speeds over 1600 rpm.
    • A dryer with an auto-sensing control that switches off when your clothes are dry.
    • At least a 4-star energy rating and 4-star water rating.
    • A front loading washing machine, you'll use even less water and energy.
  • Try to do your ironing in large batches - that way you won't waste energy heating and reheating your iron every time.

 

lighting


Did you know that about 6% of the average home's energy bill comes from lighting?15


Try these bright ideas

  • Get into the habit of turning off the lights when you leave a room.
  • If you don't need much light, use lamps or spotlights instead of lighting the whole room.
  • Install motion sensors or timers on your security lights - so you don't have to remember to turn them off at night. 
  • Use solar lights to light up your garden pathways - they store energy during the day and then light up automatically at night. 

 

big or small investment 


Small investment

  • Keep heat in by sealing gaps and crackes in walls, doors and floors.
  • Use draft stoppers on windows and doors.
  • Use a shade cloth or external blinds to keep heat out.

Large investment

  • Insulate your house - it's a cost-effective investment and could save up to 45% on your heating and cooling bills.26
  • Try a pergola or other shade device to keep direct sunlight off your windows.
  • Install skylights in your darker rooms - they look great and you won't need to use your lights as much.
  • Install solar hot water - it could provide up to 90% of your hot water needs.27
  • Front loading washing machines use less energy than top loaders.
  • Always check the energy efficiency label when buying new appliances. The more stars it has, the move efficient it is.

  



Understand your energy usage

Household appliances

How much energy does a fridge use? In these energy fact sheets you’ll find the estimated average running costs for the most common household appliances.


Saving tip references

1-14. These Savings have been calculated using the general domestic, GST inclusive, usage price per unit from the various electricity distribution networks in your state. Prices per unit are effective:

  • In Queensland as of 17 October 2016.
  • In New South Wales as of 29 July 2016.
  • In the ACT as of 17 October 2016.
  • In South Australia as of 22 October 2016.
  • In Victoria as of 1 January 2017.

For more details and the savings figure specific to your state, see the estimated yearly energy savings page.

15. Projected average home energy use in 2012 www.yourhome.gov.au/energy.

16. Based on a 7.7 kW capacity air conditioner (2.42 kW input) used for 5 hours with the thermostat set at 24℃ on days with temperatures over 28℃.

17. Based on a 7.7 kW capacity air conditioner (2.42 kW input) with the thermostat set at 24℃, used on days with highs of 30℃ or more.

18. Based on using a 65 watt ceiling fan for 10 hours a day, compared to a 7.5 kW capacity air conditioner (2.42 kW input) with the thermostat set at 24℃ for 5 hours a day on days with temperatures over 28℃.

19. Based on gas hot water, showering for 4 mins instead of 8 mins twice a day using an enegy efficient shower fitting (7 L/min flow) over 90-per day summer quarter (Nov-Jan).

20. Based on gas hot water with annual savings in a medium sized household (4 people using 90 MJ/day).

21. Based on a plasma TV (using 8 watts on standby), set top box (using 13.3 watts on standby) and game console (using 5.4 watts on standby) on standby for 21 hours a day.

22. Based on a desktop computer (using 3.5 watts on standby) and ADSL wireless modem (using 8.3 watts on standby) on standby for 20 hours a day and a inkjet printer (using 6.2 watts on standby) on standby for 23 hours a day.

23. Based on a front loader washing machine using 5.8 watts on standby mode for 154 hours a week (based on average use of 1 load a day, cycle time of 2 hours).

24. Source is ACT Governement's Energy Smart Booklet.

25. Based on a 5.5kg auto-sense type dryer, consuming 4.5kW per load, saving 1 load a week each year.

26. & 27. Source is www.yourhome.gov.au/passive-design/insulation-installation

# Source is ACT Governement's Energy Smart Booklet.

> Source is www.yourhome.gov.au/energy/appliances.

Back to top


The Retailer Energy Efficiency Scheme (REES) in South Australia

In 2009, the South Australian Government introduced an energy efficiency scheme – offering services such as in-home energy audits, installation of energy efficient products and a range of advice.

The energy efficiency products available for homes under the Scheme include:

  • Energy Efficient Lighting*
  • Standby Power Controllers
  • Water Saving Showerheads
  • Chimney Balloons

Retailers offer free in-home energy audits for priority group households, as well as advice on other energy efficiency activities through their partners.

As Origin has met its Energy Efficiency Audit Target for 2017 with the Essential Services Commission of SA, we aren’t offering Home Energy Efficiency Audits under the REES this year.

If you need a new Home Energy Efficiency Audit, please contact the SA Government Energy Advisory Service.

*The existing lighting equipment must be in working order at the time of the upgrade. Some upgrades may be excluded based on specific scheme eligibility requirements.