6 Ways Origin is Tackling Climate Change

25 October 2017

Our position on climate change is absolutely clear. We unequivocally support measures to progressively reduce global emissions and acknowledge the role the energy sector needs to play in transitioning to a lower carbon future. 

We believe Australia can achieve net zero emissions for the electricity sector by 2050 or earlier. This year, Origin has taken strong steps towards building a cleaner and smarter energy future.

Here’s some of the things we are doing or have already done. You can read our full 2017 Sustainability report here.

  1. We’ve committed to an additional 1,200 MW of large scale solar and wind energy since March 2016. This is enough electricity to power all the homes in Ballarat, Adelaide and Newcastle combined1
  2. By 2020, we are targeting for renewables to make up more than 25 per cent of our generation mix
  3. We’re also making sure our fleet of lower emissions peaking gas-fired generators is ready to play an increasingly important role in maintaining energy security
  4. In 2017, we also became Australia’s largest installer of commercial solar
  5. Origin was the first energy company in the world to sign up to seven of the We Mean Business coalition commitments on climate change. You can read more here.
  6. We’re working to empower customers with cleaner, smarter energy solutions.
  •     We established O hub – a collaborative workspace for Origin teams to work alongside tech start-ups
  •     We’ve launched a trial with Californian-based tech start-up Bidgely, using smart meters to show customers where energy is being used in their homes
  •     We’ve established a small presence in California’s Silicon Valley to better connect Origin to the global epicentre of digital innovation
  •     We co-founded FreeElectrons – a global accelerator program that brings together eight forward-thinking utilities and 12 leading start-ups in the areas of renewable, smart grids, electric vehicles and home energy management
  •     Closer to home, we’re also the principal sponsor of EnergyLab, the University of Technology Sydney’s new hub for clean energy innovation

1Figure based on an average daily household consumption level of 16kWh and estimated capacity factors across all solar and wind projects.