Fair Go for the West powers Blacktown SES with solar panels

The NSW State Emergency Service (SES) unit in Blacktown is the busiest in the state, responding to 869 calls for help last year. That’s an average of two emergency calls a day! 

The NSW State Emergency Service (SES) unit in Blacktown is the busiest in the state, responding to 869 calls for help last year. That’s an average of two emergency calls a day!

Operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the Blacktown unit not only supports the community of Blacktown, but is also the back-up headquarters for the Sydney western region, covering an area from Ashfield through to Mt Victoria. To put this into perspective, it takes about two hours to get from Ashfield to Mt Victoria, so it’s a considerable area to cover.

As part of our community partnership with the NSW SES, we were proud to help the 100 volunteers that keep the doors open to this important unit by recently donating a new solar system to power the facility.  

“We recognise the great work that the NSW SES team carry out across the state, and installing this solar system at the Blacktown unit will provide long term benefits to the unit and their volunteers” said Amy Stockfeld, Origin National Campaigns & Partnerships Manager. 


“We recognise the great work that the NSW SES team carry out across the state, and installing this solar system at the Blacktown unit will provide long term benefits to the unit and their volunteers” said Amy Stockfeld, Origin National Campaigns & Partnerships Manager. 


The solar system will be likely to help the Blacktown unit save money on their energy bills as it has been designed to cover a significant amount of their daytime energy needs, limiting the unit’s reliance on the electricity grid.

And, if their system generates more electricity than they use, then the additional power is fed back into the grid, which may entitle them to earn a rebate.

As solar panels generally have a life span of around 25 years, with little maintenance or running costs required this is a long term benefit for the unit. 

Also, the new system will help the Blacktown unit reduce its impact on the environment; as solar systems produce no greenhouse gas emissions when generating power.

As well as the environmental and cost benefits of the new solar panels, the team at Blacktown are also looking forward to conducting training on how to work safely around solar panels in an emergency situation. 

Recent studies show that the households of Western Sydney have taken up solar at a faster rate than other parts of the state, with almost a quarter of all homes installing solar, compared to only 20 percent in other parts of Sydney.1

So it’s comforting to know that with solar systems in Western Sydney becoming a prevalent element in the SES landscape, the Blacktown unit will be ready to navigate around them during any emergencies. 

References

  1. Data collected between January 2014 – December 2014 by Nature with a sample size of 892 people in Western Sydney V 1,718 people for the rest of Sydney . 
  2. Data collected between January 2014 – December 2014 by Nature with a sample size of 892 people in Western Sydney V 1,718 people for the rest of Sydney . 

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