Want lower energy bills this summer?

In Australia, summer is synonymous with cricket, and that means TV, air con and well-chilled drinks.

For many Aussies, summer equals cricket. And, for Aussie cricket fans who love the long lazy days of Test watching, or others who prefer the smash-and-bash excitement of T20, this means long hours to follow in front of the TV with a cold drink in one hand, the remote control in the other, and air-conditioning switched on, keeping us comfortable.

Don’t get caught out by a hefty power bill at the end of the season. By following a few simple tips, you might be able to save on your electric bill costs. Get your cricket fix on TV without busting your energy bill.

7 tips for watching sport without spiking your power bills

1. Use an Esky instead of a second fridge

If your second fridge is more than seven years old it could be costing you between $37 and $137 to run across the cricket season.2 Instead of a second drinks fridge, why not use an Esky for the short-term overflow? It won’t cost you anything other than a few cubes of ice or some reusable ice bricks. If you’re looking at other ways to conserve energy, this might help reduce electricity usage.

In addition to a lower energy bill, an Esky means you will never miss a minute of the game as everything is in reaching distance.  

2. Replace old fridges to save on power

If you do want to use a second fridge, you might be able to reduce energy consumption by making sure it’s not too old. Replacing your old drinks fridge with a new energy-efficient model could save you anywhere between $46 and $77 in running costs during the summer of cricket, depending on the size of your fridge and its efficiency.3

3. Check the age of your air conditioner

If you’re wanting to reduce the cost of air conditioning, using a 3.6 to 5 kW air-conditioner, dated post 2007, could save you around $126 in energy costs over the cricket season.4

4. New LCD TVs over older plasmas

A great way to reduce energy consumption is to use a newer LCD TV over older plasmas.

Newer LCD TVs are cheaper to run than older plasmas. If you were to replace a 65-inch plasma unit with a newer 65-inch LCD TV, you could save up to $85 in energy usage this cricket season.5 And as an added benefit, the technology behind the screens has advanced so much you’ll be able to rival Hawk-eye. 

5. Don’t turn your air-con lower than 24 degrees

Yes, it’s hot. But every degree lower than 24 degrees could add about 5–10% to your air conditioning unit’s energy consumption.

6. Check your fridge thermostat

Set your main fridge thermostat between 3°C and 5°C, and the freezer to between -15°C and -18°C. Every degree lower can require about 5% more energy.6

7. Switch off the air con and use a fan

No, we’re not even joking. Turning off your air con and using a fan is one of the best ways to conserve energy. Sure, there might be days when it’s just too hot, but if you’re looking to save on electricity bill costs, see if you can make do with the fan. 


“If your second fridge is over seven years old, it could be costing you up to $137 more to run across the cricket season.”


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References

  1. Based on estimated television viewing hours for 103 matches across six different international and domestic cricket competitions being hosted in Australia and broadcast on Australian TV between 5 November 2014 and 26 March 2015: KFC International T3 Series (Ch 9), Commonwealth Bank Test Series (Ch 9), Carlton Mid ODI Series (Ch 9), Carlton Mid ODI Tri series (Ch 9), KFC T20 Big Bash (Network Ten), and ICC Cricket World Cup broadcast (Ch 9 and Foxtel).
  2. Running costs based on the 140 days of the summer of cricket (5 November 2014 to 26 March 2015) for fridges sold before 2007 at an average cost per kWh of $0.28. Range analysed includes fridges from 50 litres up to 830 litres.
  3. Comparisons between fridges purchased prior to 2007 and models available for sale in September 2014. Range analysed includes fridges from 50 litres up to 830 litres. Average running cost per kWh of $0.28.
  4. Comparison between pre-2007 units and models available in September 2014. Costs calculated based on estimate of 363.5 day-time cricket viewing hours between 5 November 2014 and 26 March 2015, at an average cost per kWh of $0.28.
  5. Comparison between the running costs of a 65-inch plasma screen TV using 490 kW and a 65-inch LED TV using 69 kW for 710 hours of cricket viewing between 5 November 2014 and 26 March 2015, at an average cost per kWh of $0.28.
  6. Chris Riedy and Geoff Milne, Your Home appliances, Department of Industry. 
  7. Running costs based on the 140 days of the summer of cricket (5 November 2014 to 26 March 2015) for fridges sold before 2007 at an average cost per kWh of $0.28. Range analysed includes fridges from 50 litres up to 830 litres.

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