BassGas project

In October 2006, the BassGas Project was officially launched by the Premier of Victoria, Hon Steve Bracks MP. The Victorian Minister for Energy, Industries and Resources, Hon Theo Theophanous MP also attended the opening.

BassGas project Lang Lang processing facility

History

Development of the BassGas project began in 2001, lead by Origin and its original joint venture partners AWE, CalEnergy and Wandoo Petroleum Mitsui. Over a six year period, $750 million was invested by these companies to develop the Project.

This culminated in June 2006, when the Project was officially launched by the then Premier of Victoria, the Hon Steve Bracks MP.

Since then, BassGas has provided a significant supply of gas into the Victorian market. BassGas is designed to produce approximately 24 petajoules of sales gas per annum together with 1 million barrels of condensate and 75,000 tonnes of LP Gas.

Location

The Yolla offshore platform is located in 80 metres of water in the Bass Strait.

Gas and liquids are extracted from a sandstone reservoir at over 3km in depth through two wells. Once extracted, the gas and liquids from the Yolla field are transported 150km via an undersea pipeline to the Lang Lang Gas Processing Plant 70 km South of Melbourne in Victoria.

Here, the gas is processed for sale before being transported through the onshore underground gas pipeline to the Victorian Principal Gas Transmission Pipeline near Pakenham, Victoria.

The project

The Project will commercialise gas from the Yolla gas field in Bass Strait and will meet about 10% of Victoria’s current demand for 15 years.

Origin Energy is the operator of the BassGas Project, which is a Joint Venture between:

Origin Energy Limited 37.5%
Origin Energy Northwest Limited 5.0%
AWE Limited 33.75%
Toyota Tsusho Gas E&P Trefoil Pty Ltd 11.25%
ARC Energy (subsidiary of AWE) 12.5%

Looking to the future

With demand for gas in south east Australia set to continue increasing, work is under way to extend the life of the BassGas Project.

Origin is working to secure an appropriate drilling rig to undertake works on the Yolla Stage 2 Project which will see drilling and development of two new wells – Yolla 5 and Yolla 6. While works are underway to modify the Yolla Platform, the schedule for the drilling campaign will be confirmed once a rig has been secured.

Community

Our commitment

Origin respects the rights and interest of the communities in which we operate by working safely and being mindful of, and attentive to, the environmental and social impact of the resources, products and services we use or provide to others.

Employment

At the peak of construction of the BassGas Project around 300 people were employed at site.

Where possible, the BassGas Project team has also endeavoured to employ or contract local industry and suppliers. To date, more than 160 local firms have been contracted by the Project.

BassGas currently employs 53 people onsite.

Maintaining open dialogue

The BassGas community consultation process began in August 2001, when the Project was in its early stages of development. Initially the entire South Gippsland community was engaged in a range of communication activities designed to inform and educate key stakeholders about why the Joint Venture was investing in a project of this size and scale in Gippsland.

By October 2002, the BassGas Project had established a strong presence in the local community via: community consultation meetings held in local halls; public exhibitions at six locations; regular newsletters sent to all residents in the area, monthly advertorials providing project updates in local newspapers; provision of information and fact sheets to landowners; prompt replies to all written enquiries; a toll-free helpline; the Project website and visits to neighbours to discuss their issues/concerns.

Throughout all stages of development of the BassGas Project, the joint venture partners ensured that all construction was carried out in respect to the wishes of the local the Boon wurrung people. Representatives of the Boon wurrung worked as cultural heritage monitors and advisors to ensure that construction works did not disturb sacred indigenous objects, places or artefacts.

Working with local landowners

Origin works closely with the local people whose properties we require access to in order to carry out our work. This work is an important part of the planning of any project and starts long before construction takes place.

Around the BassGas Project, the team spent two years in one-on-one negotiations with around 100 local landowners to secure access to the land required to construct the underground pipelines and the Lang Lang Processing Plant.

To ensure that affected landowners were duly compensated and assisted through the project, support was offered in a range of ways including: free independent legal advice; independent land valuations; and the cost of to develop Farm Management Plans.

In addition, Origin is committed to listening to and learning from local landholders, making every effort to minimise disturbance to their property, lifestyle, animals and crops as a result of our activities. Through consultation with landowners around the BassGas Project, Origin altered the original pipeline route in order to minimise any impact on farming operations.

Investing in the community

Origin believes that good community relationships are as important as our operational management. Sponsoring community based organisations is an important element of building those community relationships. At BassGas we support local events and initiatives and employees have the opportunity to be involved in community activities.